A major international news story broke this past week: a mysterious new land mass has risen from the Atlantic ocean overnight in the middle of the Bermuda Triangle. Full of old shipwrecks and whale bones, it’s a very dangerous place to get to because sharks and stingrays constantly circle it. Few are fortunate enough to get to it after a long voyage at sea and many rugged explorers have nearly perished in their attempts. But for those who do make it, untold treasures await.

At least that’s what the mainstream media wants you to believe. Except that it’s a sandbar just off of Cape Point on Hatteras Island near Buxton, NC and arguably part of the point itself.

First, the articles:

Next, what the island really is. As the featured title image above shows, Chad Koczera took a photo with his drone (great shot!) towards the end of May of a sand bar that had formed off of Cape Point on Hatteras Island near Buxton, NC. At some point over the month of June, the story of this “new island” got legs, no doubt at least partly because it’s a great photo. Fortunately for us in this day and age, we have google earth with historical satellite photos so that we can take a look at Cape Point through time and determine if this is indeed a “new island” or not.

In the animated gif below, that starts with a satellite image of the point in February, 2017 and then tracks back in time to February, 1993, one can see the “island” beginning to form this past February. I’ve placed a red line just below the island and all that was needed at this point was for currents to bring in a few more inches of sand for the island to form. As the gif tracks back, you will see that Cape Point is in a constant state of flux with the point sometimes pointing towards the southwest as currents push it that way and as opposed towards the current southeast. More importantly, the point often extends to the red line south of the island as recently as 2014 and 2011. In 2006, the point extended south of the red line and in 2005, a sandbar suspiciously similar to the current sandbar was forming well south of the red line and current sandbar just after the 2004 photo showed virtually no point at all.

It’s not difficult to conclude that the sand in the shallow water of that area is constantly morphing as the currents do with it as they please. In fact, it’s basic earth science that coastlines are in a constant state of change, especially barrier islands (this was ninth grade when I was 14 years old in my school system, but others may be earlier). As for the reason this “island” forming is news, I believe the mainstream media has long-since tricked itself and others into believing coastlines are static as part of catastrophic anthropogenic global warming theory, which states we are all going to die from rising coast lines, among other things, and that without the industrial revolution, coastlines would be static (which has always been laughably stupid). It’s also is telling that if someone takes a nice photograph (in this case of the sandbar from the drone), the media will then build a fantastic story around it (without any sort of payment to the photog, I’m sure).

All of that having been said, many of the articles mention that it is simply a sandbar and that officials believe it could disappear at any time, but that is often at the end of the article after the average reader with the attention span of a 1.5 year old has long since moved on to the next bullshit article. I also have to give credit to the Huffington Post, which specifically reported someone stating the island is not a result of “climate change.” This is shocking for the HP, actually, but perhaps they note this because it’s new beach and not erosion taking place?

But some of the fantastic elements of this story show how bad media has become. The Mirror article can easily be thrown out as straight up tabloid nonsense (even though certainly some will believe it), but other articles probably aren’t thrown out as nonsense in people’s minds and those are fake news. The articles that mention shipwrecks and whale bones on this island are straight up fiction (and yet another embarrassment for fake news BBC), but a small amount of knowledge and research of the OBX shows how this information made its way into the article(s). The Diamond Shoals area of the OBX has long caused shipwrecks in the OBX area and research shows that Cape Point is considered the beginning of the Diamond Shoals area. As for the “whale bones”, the entrance to the Outer Banks by vehicle is known as “Whalebone Junction.” It’s called this because a businessman put a whale skeleton that had washed up south of Oregon Inlet at his gas station there and essentially renamed what was called “the junction” to Whalebone Junction. The whale bones aren’t there anymore.

As for the sharks and stingrays angle other articles take, yes, I’m sure sharks and stingrays are there, as they are everywhere in the Atlantic Ocean, but I doubt there’s any more there than at any other spot and I haven’t heard of any of the shell collectors getting eaten by sharks or stung by stingrays. As for it being a “land mass”, yes, I suppose it’s technically true, but I personally wouldn’t call a temporary sandbar a land mass.

I hate to have to use the term “debunked” because that’s what every global warming alarmist has used for any argument on the skeptic’s side since the mid-2000s and is way overused, but I believe the animated gif I made debunks the new island story. Looking at the satellite imagery and putting on my critical thinking cap, I believe that sandbar is simply a part of the point itself and within a few months the island will indeed “disappear” by joining the point to the north resulting in an elongated north-south oriented point seen in some of the satellite images before the currents take the point towards the southwest again before starting the whole cycle over. Or perhaps the seas will rise up and suddenly swallow us all as the current paradigm of climate science states.

2 thoughts on “Fake News Debunked: The New Island off of Hatteras is Simply a Part of Cape Point

  1. Great work Colin. It’s amazing the amount of hype this has recieved considering i’ve seen this thing happen time and again in my 35 years going to the OBX. Without fail there are new features each year that were not present the year prior. Last year an entire new island sprung up in Hatteras Inlet that was not even hinted at the year prior. How do i know? We spent the day on it after boating to it last year whereas the year prior we were literally drift fishing over that same area. This was not some small island – there were many boats anchored there with multiple families playing on the new shore, fishing, picnicing, etc.

    It’s worth mentioning that this particular spot along with Cape Point where the new “island” formed have extremely dynamic currents. It makes total sense that shifting sands could easily create and remove sand bars and islands from year to year – and in fact month to month or even week to week. They are barrier islands and thus prone to changing tides and currents. In fact, had the Civilian Conservation Corp not stabilized the islands with sand dunes (yes they are man made!) the islands would look radically different today and in some places might not even exist. This is a natural process that has happened for thousands of years.

    In this day and age of what alarmists call rising seas and disappearing coastlines maybe they should be happy that there is some new coast added instead of taken away!

    • When I looked at the satellite photos, I was actually kind of surprised that the point would fluctuate that much in a short period of time. It make sense, though, once you think about it for a second since that point is there because of two different currents, as evidenced by the shape of the barrier island heading off almost due north from there and overall west in the other direction. When one current is dominant, the point curls towards the north, when the other current is dominant, it curls towards the west. Then there’s mixing in between which is what is occurring now.

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